Twitter Tutorial, Number 3: Retweets & More

tweeting

So far, we’ve tackled hashtags and how to use the @ symbol, so now we’re going to handle the two other key principles of twitter – retweeting and liking! We’ll also have a look at how to add images and links to your tweets.

Retweeting

Retweeting is an important part of the twitter community, especially for small, handmade business owners; as I mentioned in the previous tutorials, twitter is a big community, and one of the ways we support each other is by retweeting!

Retweeting expands the audience of a tweet; if you spot a post from another maker that you think looks interesting, then hit the retweet icon underneath the tweet itself, and bam, that tweet is now visible to all your followers too; one or more of them might in turn retweet it, and before you know it one little tweet has reached a big audience – this wouldn’t be possible without all of us working together to promote each other! Don’t just retweet randomly though; I only retweet those tweets which genuinely fit with my own interests; at the end of the day I don’t want to spam my own followers with loads of random offerings!

Liking

Hitting the like button (the little red heart) at the bottom of people’s tweets is another way to show support and appreciation for your fellow tweeps; if you see something you like, be sure to click the heart. As a maker myself, I can say it genuinely gives you a little boost when somebody likes one of your tweets, especially when that tweet is promoting one of your products.

Inserting Links

If you’re a maker or artist you are going to want to include links to your products in your tweets, so that people can get straight to the item in question in your online shop. How you share your products will depend on what platform you use to sell online.

For example, if you have an Etsy shop, then the Etsy Seller’s App (if you have a smart phone, and don’t already have this free app, then I highly recommend you get it) allows you to share the link directly; just go to ‘Your Items’, and click on the product you want to tweet about, and there will be a ‘SHARE’ option in the bottom right corner – this will open the link in twitter, as well as automatically adding the primary image of the listing in question – which means you get a link and an image, all while using just 20 characters or so. Most other ecommerce platforms will have a similar option.

Inserting Images

Having an image attached to your tweet is always a good idea. People are much more likely to engage with a tweet if there is a visual element to it. As mentioned earlier, if you include a link in your tweet, then it will normally automatically add the primary image on the page you linked from to the tweet. But for those occasions where you are not including a link in your tweet, or this function doesn’t work, then you can add an image (or images) manually. You can add images by using the picture icon when composing your tweet, or the camera icon allows you to take a picture there and then, to attach to the tweet.

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